610-717-2879
Select Page

Recently a client wanted to know if Google provided an option for sharing budgets across campaigns.  Last year Google AdWords released a new feature that allows users to do just that.

How It Works

Shared budgets let you allocate budget across multiple campaigns. For advertisers with a set marketing budget for AdWords campaigns, they can consider using a shared budget instead of setting up individual campaign budgets.

ppc agency google adwords shared budgets

With shared budgets AdWords can automatically adjust how budgets are allocated across different campaigns to help improve return-on-investment.  For example:

Your overall marketing plan allows you to spend $100 per day across your three campaigns. Without shared budgets, you’d next have to decide how to allocate the $100 daily AdWords budget across each of your three campaigns. Say you set a $60 daily budget for your desktop campaign, a $20 daily budget for your mobile campaign, and $20 to your remarketing campaign.

On most days, each campaign hits its daily budget and you’re satisfied with the ROI of each campaign. But on some days, your desktop search campaign sees fewer impressions and clicks than other days. So you only spend $90. On these days, your overall campaign results could be stronger if you were able to put an additional $10 into your mobile search campaign or remarketing campaign.

Can You Switch Back

Don’t worry your decision is not set in stone.  You can always switch back to using individual campaign budgets for full control over how much you spend per campaign.

A shared budget is ideal if you don’t have a lot of time to spend monitoring your campaign budgets, but would still like to get the most clicks possible for your ads within a set budget.

Warning

If you decide to give shared budgets a try be sure to monitor your campaign results carefully.  It’s possible that one campaign can monopolize others.  For example if one campaign has more competitive keywords than another it might, due to high search volume, suck up more than it’s fair share of your campaign budget.  Google does not tell us how they regulate share of budget in these circumstances.